TEA Club: the lunch circle

TEA club is a judge-free 40 minutes. People are accepted no matter their personal beliefs, ethnicity, or sexuality.

“It is ran by members of the student body, and is a very good atmosphere for those looking to be more in the community or learn more about it,” explained Matt Ralston.

It is a very open platform for people who may be struggling with themselves, and anyone who wants to talk to people who could be having similar experiences and feel heard and love.

“We are just trying to help people be more comfortable with who they are and be open and able to talk about [what they would like to vent or get help with] it,” commented Hannah Barney, who is part of the TEA Club comity.

“It means a lot to me because there are a lot of kids out there that have a horrible home life and aren’t accepted for who they are in their families whether it be religion, trust, or any other reason, and its nice to see how happy they can be – that’s what really makes me the happiest is just seeing everyone else happy,” said Pheonix.

Everyone has had very positive things to say about the club and love going there to talk, eat chips and salsa, and get to know a variety of people.

“We talk about stuff and we eat salsa and draw on the board, basically just have fun like a bunch of teenagers hanging out,” commented Hallie Campbell.

It takes place every Friday during lunch in Mrs.Call’s room, room 2310, and everybody is welcome.

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TEA Club: the lunch circle

TEA club is a judge-free 40 minutes. People are accepted no matter their personal beliefs, ethnicity, or sexuality.

“It is ran by members of the student body, and is a very good atmosphere for those looking to be more in the community or learn more about it,” explained Matt Ralston.

It is a very open platform for people who may be struggling with themselves, and anyone who wants to talk to people who could be having similar experiences and feel heard and love.

“We are just trying to help people be more comfortable with who they are and be open and able to talk about [what they would like to vent or get help with] it,” commented Hannah Barney, who is part of the TEA Club comity.

“It means a lot to me because there are a lot of kids out there that have a horrible home life and aren’t accepted for who they are in their families whether it be religion, trust, or any other reason, and its nice to see how happy they can be – that’s what really makes me the happiest is just seeing everyone else happy,” said Pheonix.

Everyone has had very positive things to say about the club and love going there to talk, eat chips and salsa, and get to know a variety of people.

“We talk about stuff and we eat salsa and draw on the board, basically just have fun like a bunch of teenagers hanging out,” commented Hallie Campbell.

It takes place every Friday during lunch in Mrs.Call’s room, room 2310, and everybody is welcome.

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What teachers are doing to improve students’ mental health

There’s no doubt that students today are experience higher rates of anxiety and depression. Just in the state of Utah, 33% of kids grades 9-12 have reported symptoms of depression, while 22% have had suicidal thoughts. 14% of kids ages 12-17 have reported having depressive episodes. This begs the question, what about life today is making students more anxious and depressed? What are teachers doing about it? Is there a solution?

Abnormal or impaired brain chemistry, and hormones are the obvious answer, but why are there more “chemical imbalances” found in people today compared to those in the past? Well, low self-esteem, comparison, and peer pressure all add to the mix.

“Students have more access to information that allows them to compare. It’s really hard to compete with somebody’s best Facebook page. As we do that more and more, we fall into this trap, and that is we compare our weaknesses to somebody else’s strengths, and that is an infinite defeat,” Tim Larson, English teacher at Davis High, said.

He continued with, “It’s interesting how corrosive contemporary society can be if you let it in constantly telling you you’re not enough. It’s not only you don’t have enough, but you aren’t enough, and you never will be enough. Those are, if internalized, are destructive messages.”

Heather Bauer, another English teacher here at Davis High, added that there is a lot of pressure from outside influences to fit into a specific mold.

“There’s a lot of pressure to be this, I don’t even know. Nobody really knows what it is but we’re all trying to reach for something that nobody can really define. But we’ll know if you get there,” she commented.

While teachers are not qualified to deal with these sensitive situations, both Larsen and Bauer do think it is everyone’s responsibility to help someone in need.

“I think it’s a human to human obligation. I think it’s a common good thing. I think everyone’s health and happiness is everybody else’s obligation and responsibility. So, as a teacher, if I have some kind of insight as to how to be healthier mentally, how to address anxiety, then if I can share than is a respectful and productive way to students then I want to do that,” Larsen shared.

In his own classroom, he’s connecting the literature he teaches in the classroom to deeper messages about life and happiness. He also tries to work with the students, and their stress levels, when it comes to assigning homework.

Mrs. Bauer takes a similar approach. She also tries to make her class low stress when it comes to homework and grades, and she also likes to send positive and affirming messages to her students.

“That’s always a goal of mine. To create a relationship with the kids, look them in the face, let them know that they’re important, and just ask them about their day. Not just about my class, not just about English, but how are you doing? How are things? I treat them like a human being, not just a student, because you guys are.”

While there is no perfect way to handle this issue, and there may be no perfect solution that completely cures depression or anxiety, but there are ideas that can help make the world a more enjoyable place to be in. As for improving the education system to alleviate anxiety, both Bauer and Larsen would advise the administration and school board listen to the students and their needs to create an environment that students want to be in, as well as place less of an emphasis on grades. As far as the social and emotional aspect of it, Larsen encourages students to be defiant to messages.

While improving students’ mental health may take a huge support system of parents, friends, and others, Larsen, Bauer, and all the teachers here at Davis want you to know they are here for you.

“There are adults in this building that care about these kids so much. So, so much. To be able to create that relationship where a student feels comfortable with me is my goal. That’s why I wanted to be a teacher is because somebody did that for me. Somebody said, ‘You’re safe here, and you’re okay,’” stated Bauer.

 

 

Sources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/teen-depression/symptoms-causes/syc-20350985

https://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/facts-and-stats/national-and-state-data-sheets/adolescent-mental-health-fact-sheets/utah/index.html

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How the season change affects your mood

During the September and October months, Davis county prepares for seasonal change from summer to fall. With these seasonal changes comes chaos with the preparations for colder months. Some things that may occur during these times are things that may effect your mental health, such as seasonal depression, and they may make activities that you usually enjoy not as appealing. There are about 3 million cases of seasonal depression per year. It usually starts in the fall and continues into the winter months.

“My mental health improves because fall is my favorite, Halloween, wearing warm clothes,the cold,” says Talia Swindell.

Some people’s mental health improves during this time. It could boost their mood as well as improves sleep, helps you burn calories, and it helps with your allergies. With limited sunshine our bodies produce less serotonin and more melatonin, making us less energetic. Lower serotonin levels are linked to depression. The reduced sunlight disrupts your body clock, drops your serotonin levels and may lead you into feeling depressed. Aerobic activity for 20-30 minutes of activity a week can improve cardiovascular health.

Some ways to deal with seasonal depression include going outside more, doing sports such as skiing, indoor swim at areas like surf n swim,  medications, and therapies.

 

 

 

 

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Intro to Education Class

Are you interested in teaching, but aren’t ready for the commitment of an internship? An alternative option would be to take the CE Intro to Education class taught by Melody Beutler. It is a class that gives students the opportunity to experience a classroom setting, earn high school elective credit, and earn 3 college credits through Weber State’s Concurrent Enrollment Program.

In the CE Intro to Education class students have to opportunity to observe other teachers and teach lessons themselves. Students are given 12 opportunities to observe teachers from elementary schools, junior highs, and high schools. The students schedule these appointments with the teachers and use this opportunity to learn what they like about various teaching styles and what they dislike. The students are required to go to at least 2 elementary classes, 2 junior high class, and 2 high school class and the remaining 6 are up to the students to decide. The requirement for all grade levels is a good requirement because a student may think they want to be a kindergarten teacher, but might come to find out that the environment of a kindergarten class is too innocent or immature for them. It gives students a real opportunity to find out what they might want to do.

Students are also given an opportunity to teach a lesson while participating in this class. Mrs. Beutler has an awesome way for students to do this. There is criteria and lessons that need to be covered while taking the course, so rather than teaching them herself she gives the students the opportunity to teach those lessons. She assigns the lesson you will teach at the beginning of the semester and requires that you make a power-point for the class for students to follow along with to take the required notes, that there is active discussion during the lesson, and that there is an activity to involve the class. You are given a partner to teach this lesson with and get a feel for the style that you would want to teach.

Students also have the opportunity to attend seminars and conferences and learn from district officials and teachers. This gives students an understanding of how the school system functions and opens up the opportunity to work at a district level. These officials have a great perspective on education and have seen some of the most amazing transformations among students through out their years of teaching and this is a great opportunity for students participating in this class.

I had the opportunity to speak with Melody Beutler, the teacher for this class, and gain her perspective on this class. She said she loves teaching this class and that, “the students are just great! They are great and outstanding.” She expressed the importance and relevance that CE plays on the pathway to higher education and that the Intro to Education Class is one of many classes that can put students on this path. The students are open to discuss the issues that teacher face and she said that, “I learn from the students and I am always impressed by the insight they bring to the class.” She also talked about the success she has seen come from this class. She has had teachers gone on to teach and some have even gone on to teach in other countries and become successful.

I have loved taking this class because I have always wanted to be a teacher. This class has really given me a feel for the kind of teacher I aspire to be. I understand what subjects’ interest me more than others. It also has taught me what forms of teaching are effective and which ones are aren’t. I have learned that keeping students interested is a key component to teaching, especially teaching teenagers, which is what I am interested in. I have a better understanding of how I might want to teach one day and I believe that the teachers that I have disagreed with their method most are the best ones because I learn what I do not want to be as I further myself into becoming a teacher.

 

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Will “The Crucible” Cause You to Hang in Confusion?

The Crucible written by “Arthur Miller” is a play about the Salem witch trials. The Salem witch trials was a huge mass panic in a holy community called Salem, this mass panic was because of witchcraft. However, the only person in the entire story who practices anything close to witchcraft is Tituba, a servant who knows voodoo magic.

Is this a hard book to read? In my opinion “no it is not a hard book.” Is it confusing? “yes.” The author expects you to know certain things before reading. The author also blames small things on multiple people and since you only can read what the characters are saying it is extremely difficult to know who did something. The author also hints to important character flaws and strengths without saying it in any way. An example of this is mannerisms and the way that characters word their sentences.

The book is very easy to read, the figurative language is almost nonexistent. This book focuses on the idea that what the character thinks is true is a reality in that person’s mind.

Overall this book is a light and fun read to anyone who is into puzzles and problems. This book unwinds into a huge puzzle that is fun to solve.

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Pass, Set, Hit: Davis High Volleyball

Davis High girls volleyball has been doing really well this season. They practice all the time and are doing everything they can to finish off the season with a bang. The team has practices almost everyday, and they work really hard to be where they are. They are ranked 9th in region, and 26th in state.

Last week, they took a loss to Fremont, but recovered with a win against Weber. The Fremont game was close, and they only lost each game by a couple points. They did really well in the Weber game beating them 25-22 in the first game, 25-15, and 25-20 in the last game. This week they played Northridge, which was a tough loss, but they did their best and only lost by a few points.

The team has been bonding and working together to be the best that they can be; when asked about times she felt a lot of team spirit Senior Madi Rushton said:

“The Fremont game was really close, and the whole team was really encouraging”

The team has a lot of new sophomores this year. One of them, Hannah Goodfellow,  said:

“I have loved it so far because the juniors and seniors have been really nice and have helped improve my skill level”

To get ready for the game next week, they are practicing hard and watching videos of previous games to know what to be prepared for. The game at home against Syracuse is Tuesday at 3:30, make sure to go and cheer Davis on!

 

 

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The Opioid Crisis: Utah’s rising epidemic

The United States is facing an increasingly problematic issue that poses a major threat to many people. Recently though, teens have entered the scene and it proves troubling for many.

The Opioid Crisis has significantly been rising in the past few years. So where does Utah enter into this? Utah has ranked top 10 in the country for overdose deaths for the last ten years. The National Institute on Drug Abuse stated that there were 456 deaths related to an opioid overdose in 2017.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse also reported that, “Every day, more than 130 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids.” This is a somber fact that should inspire us to try and do something to stop the opioid crisis from spreading even more.

“From 2000 to 2015, Utah experienced a nearly 400% increase in deaths from the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs,” stated the Utah Department of Health. This has pushed Utah to take significant steps in decreasing overdose deaths from opioids.

The Utah Department of Health has received funding to address the opidemic. They have also been distributing Naloxone, which has contributed to saving lives. The department has funded community clinics, substance use treatment facilities, and community organizations.

Teens in Utah have been abusing prescription drugs that contain opioids. They abuse these prescriptions because social media portrays it as popular and normal, they are looking for acceptance with their peers, have a lack of confidence, or are simply going through a rebellious phase. Opioids can also be unintentionally abused if teens are recovering from a sports injury. They may become dependent on it so that there isn’t a lot of pain.

Teens and adults should seek out help from a trusted adult or professional counselor if they are dealing with opioid addiction. Seeking out help and gaining support from family and friends will help teens on their road to recovery.

 

 

 

 

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The Opioid Crisis: Utah’s rising epidemic

The United States is facing an increasingly problematic issue that poses a major threat to many people. Recently though, teens have entered the scene and it proves troubling for many.

The Opioid Crisis has significantly been rising in the past few years. So where does Utah enter into this? Utah has ranked top 10 in the country for overdose deaths for the last ten years. The National Institute on Drug Abuse stated that there were 456 deaths related to an opioid overdose in 2017.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse also reported that, “Every day, more than 130 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids.” This is a somber fact that should inspire us to try and do something to stop the opioid crisis from spreading even more.

“From 2000 to 2015, Utah experienced a nearly 400% increase in deaths from the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs,” stated the Utah Department of Health. This has pushed Utah to take significant steps in decreasing overdose deaths from opioids.

The Utah Department of Health has received funding to address the opidemic. They have also been distributing Naloxone, which has contributed to saving lives. The department has funded community clinics, substance use treatment facilities, and community organizations.

Teens in Utah have been abusing prescription drugs that contain opioids. They abuse these prescriptions because social media portrays it as popular and normal, they are looking for acceptance with their peers, have a lack of confidence, or are simply going through a rebellious phase. Opioids can also be unintentionally abused if teens are recovering from a sports injury. They may become dependent on it so that there isn’t a lot of pain.

Teens and adults should seek out help from a trusted adult or professional counselor if they are dealing with opioid addiction. Seeking out help and gaining support from family and friends will help teens on their road to recovery.

 

 

 

 

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How to make a boring subject fun: Jennifer Janes

Jennifer Janes is a English teacher at Davis High School. English is known to be one of the more bland subjects, but Mrs. Janes goes above and beyond to make it a little more interesting.

When walking into Mrs. Janes class the first thing you see is a beaming smile and the happy eyes of Jennifer. She is a bright happy person who never seems pessimistic.

Jennifer Janes started teaching 20 years ago at Davis and has never left since. She has a love for Davis and its students that has kept her working there for her whole career. She says her favorite thing about Davis High School are the students.

“We have awesome students here at Davis High.”

When asked what her least favorite thing about Davis was she paused, trying to think and answered saying

” I cant think of anything, that’s probably why I’ve been here for 20 years.”

In her past-time she likes to play volleyball, or to go on a run. She also enjoys scrapbooking and spending time with her kids. In college Jennifer originally majored in Physical Education and was planning on teaching in that area, but eventually became interested in English and began majoring in that.

Jennifer Janes is an excellent English teacher that can add a little flavor the the bland subject that is English with her positive, happy attitude and demeanor.

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